Wildlife Crime Tech Challenge

Find out how our 16 Prize Winners plan to fight wildlife crime–and how you can help!

Wildlife trafficking is pushing many animals towards extinction, including species of elephants, rhinos, tigers, pangolins, turtles, and parrots. The crisis also has a human toll: in the last decade, more than 1,000 rangers have lost their lives protecting wildlife. Criminal networks that are increasingly involved in wildlife trafficking are more organized, sophisticated, and technologically advanced than ever before. For this reason, the Wildlife Crime Tech Challenge called on the global community to harness the power of science and technology to address four wildlife-trafficking related issues.  

We will reward solutions that address four critical wildlife crime issues

Strengthen Forensic Evidence

The Problem: Authorities are often unable to identify illegal wildlife parts and products quickly or accurately or to share critical data with other agencies. This hampers the interdiction and criminal prosecution of traffickers.

Show me these solutions

We will reward solutions that address four critical wildlife crime issues

Detect Transit Routes

The Problem: Criminal gangs move illegal wildlife and wildlife parts to market undetected via complex and ever-changing transportation routes and, increasingly, over a vast and mostly unregulated online market. 

Show me these solutions

We will reward solutions that address four critical wildlife crime issues

Reduce Consumer Demand

The Problem: Cultural and societal norms influence surging demand for illegal wildlife. Live wildlife and their parts are used as pets, status symbols, ornaments, food, medicine, and religious symbols. Lack of awareness means that many consumers do not realize their actions contribute to the decimation of wild animal populations and an underground criminal trade that hurts economies and communities.

Show me these solutions

We will reward solutions that address four critical wildlife crime issues

Tackle Corruption

The Problem: Corruption enables wildlife trafficking at multiple stages along illegal supply chains. As the trade becomes more lucrative and dangerous, there are greater incentives for individuals in positions of power to accept bribes or other favors, or even to organize illegal trade networks.

Show me these solutions

down
light bulb computer mouse camera satelite network nodes

Meet our Prize Winners!

Sixteen innovators receive $10,000, as well as recognition, networking, and technical support. They will now compete for as much as $500,000 to scale their solutions. Learn more about our Prize Winners.

Learn more about our Prize Winners

down

Get Updates

To your inbox

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

On our blog